Jackie's blog

What I learned from my staph infection

Since being hospitalized for a staph infection earlier this year, I’ve been surprised to learn how many of my friends and colleagues have had a similar experience. For most people, treatment with an antibiotic topical or prescription oral medication is sufficient to stop a skin infection. But for others, like me, taking an oral antibiotic isn’t enough, which is why I ended up in the hospital for IV drug treatment and surgery to remove the stubborn infection that set up residence in my left elbow.

Kids and Cars: Summer heat can be deadly

It happens every summer, a baby or child dies after being left in a car on a warm day.  On average, 38 children die from heatstroke after being left in a car every year.  What many parents don't realize a child's body temperature can rise five times faster than an adult's.  I talked to Jill Howell-Berg, MD, pediatrician, Kosair Children’s Hospital Medical Associates – Clarksville about the dangers of leaving children in cars in the summer heat and what to do to help prevent heat-related deaths. 

Don’t take your good health for granted

Never take good health or good health care for granted. I experienced that firsthand this week when my usually super-good health went downhill fast. I woke up one morning feeling terrific, ready to start the day in my typical zero-to-60 fashion. But a sudden throbbing in my left elbow gave me pause and made me wonder what I might have done to hurt myself. Except for the tiniest of scrapes, neither my husband nor I found much to worry about. Within hours, however, my elbow was swollen — as big as a tennis ball, quite red and hot to the touch. My oldest daughter, Katie, who’s a physician assistant, quickly diagnosed an infection and encouraged me to see my primary care physician. That’s rule No. 1: Everybody should have a primary care physician.

Good hygiene helps keep norovirus away

Have you ever had the “stomach flu”? My family has and it’s the pits. What we commonly call stomach flu is a norovirus infection. Did you know norovirus is the leading cause of foodborne illness in the United States?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 20 million Americans are sickened by norovirus every year, causing up to 71,000 hospitalizations and 800 deaths. Norovirus is highly contagious and it can stay in your system for two weeks or longer, even after you feel better. The virus can spread through contaminated food, but it also can live on surfaces, such as countertops and serving utensils, for up to two weeks. The virus can spread quickly in closed places such as daycare centers, nursing homes, dormitories and schools, with most outbreaks in the U.S. occurring between November and April. Norovirus is not related to the virus that causes the flu (influenza), which is a respiratory illness.

ADHD medication and kids

In a report presented in May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated that more than 10,000 toddlers in the United States are being medicated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to The New York Times, “the American Academy of Pediatrics standard practices guidelines for ADHD do not even address the diagnosis in children 3 and younger.” This report is the latest to raise concerns about ADHD diagnosis and medication for children in the U.S. A survey released by the CDC in 2013 found that 11 percent of children ages 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD and that one in five boys will receive the diagnosis during childhood.

BLUEberry Salad

 

In honor of the UK Wildcats and the NCAA Final Four game tomorrow night, I’m sharing my favorite salad, which includes blueberries! The dressing is super light and delicious with an unexpected twist my husband, Paul, added. 

 

 

 

Salad recipe:

Box of fresh mixed greens (we like organic and they don’t cost much more than regular)

4-ounce package of fresh blueberries

4 ounces feta cheese crumbles

Almond slivers (or candied pecans, which I make ahead of time)

Small can of mandarin orange slices, drained

Does spanking lead to a cycle of misbehavior?

Being a parent is not an easy job. To me, it’s the toughest job in the world that requires no prior experience or four-year degree. And it’s certainly a test of a parent’s patience when a child is fussy, angry, defiant or just generally “difficult.”

When I was a kid I got a spanking when I did something my parents told me not to do. Sometimes it was a swat on the bottom, but it also could be dad’s belt or a switch from a bush out front. Fortunately, I didn’t get too many spankings — but they left a lasting impression.

Doctor-pilot rescues pets

When he’s not in the operating room or meeting with patients before or after weight loss surgery, Jeff W. Allen, M.D., might be heading to the airport on a rescue mission. Dr. Allen, director of bariatric surgery at Norton Weight Management Services, has combined a lifelong love for animals with a passion for flying. He’s a volunteer for Pilots N Paws, a nonprofit group that links willing pilots with animal rescue groups, and The Arrow Fund, which provides medical treatment to animals that have been victims of extreme torture, abuse or neglect. At least 10 times in the past two years, Dr. Allen has flown thousands of miles to pick up animals in need of a home or emergency medical care.

New Stroke Guidelines for Women

The American Stroke Association issued new guidelines for preventing stroke for women. The new guidelines take into account specific risk factors that are only prevalent in women. These new guidelines provide better tools for physicians to use when evaluating a women's potential for a stroke.

Jackie Hays interviews Lynn Hundley, MSN, RN, APRN, CCRN, CNRN, CCNS, about the new stroke guidelines and warns that worldwide one in six people will have a stroke in their lifetime.

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